Cultural Storytelling

The Curation


A Reflection on the Curation

The story above can best be classified as a “long form curation.” According to Content Curation Techniques, when you pull from multiple sources and tell a narrative or a story, you’re creating a long form curation. I’m not sure you can classify my curation as “storytelling,” because it doesn’t necessarily have the beginning, middle, or end that Content Curation Techniques describes, but it is also not the “short form curation” because of the abundance and variety of sources curated to create a narrative.

Kanter’s process of curation most closely resonated with what I worked for in the above curation. She describes content curation as:

“the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.”

Rather than present my readers with a collection of links and allowing them to draw their own conclusions, I worked to “cherry pick” the content that its “important and relevant to share,” and put the resources in context with “organization, annotation, and presentation” (Kanter, 2011).

I found that most of the sources I curated in the above story did something similar to my process and to Kanter’s process. They chose an “angle” from which to discuss the topic, and then pulled in sources and statistics and content around that theme. This is the “sense” that Kanter describes: they chose to leave some things out, and chose to include other things. Most of them also chose a “side” almost in an attempt to persuade their audience that either the millennial generation indeed deserves this reputation, or that the millennial generation is treated unfairly. A few also chose to tell the story of the middle ground, pointing out that while a few common traits can probably be identified, it usually doesn’t work to vastly generalize a large group of people into a monolithic identity. In all of these, I found that they utilized the element of conflict: they juxtaposed what is “said,” or what “people commonly believe,” against what they say is “true.”


References

Content Curation Techniques. (2013). Retrieved from http://curationtraffic.com/podcast/content-curation-techniques/

Fry, R. (2016, April 25). Millennials overtake Baby Boomers as America’s largest generation. Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/04/25/millennials-overtake-baby-boomers/

Hess, S. (2011, June 10). Millennials: Who they are and why we hate them. TEDxSF. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/P-enHH-r_FM

Hill, C. (2016, June 21). Millennials engage with their smartphones more than they do actual humans. Market Watch. Retrieved from http://www.marketwatch.com/story/millennials-engage-with-their-smartphones-more-than-they-do-actual-humans-2016-06-21

Kanter, B. (2011, October 4). Content curation primer. [Web log comment]. Retrieved from http://www.bethkanter.org/content-curation-101/

Main, D. (2013, July 9). Who are the millennials? Live Science. Retrieved from http://www.livescience.com/38061-millennials-generation-y.html 

Rose, F. (2011, March 8).  The art of immersion: Why do we tell stories? Wired. Retrieved from http://www.wired.com/business/2011/03/why-do-we-tell-stories/

Stein, J. (2013, May 20). Millennials: The me me me generation. TIME. Retrieved from http://time.com/247/millennials-the-me-me-me-generation/ 

Steinburg, S. (2015, August 21). Millennial vs. Boomers: Habits and characteristics. Parade. Retrieved from https://parade.com/417128/scott_steinberg/millennial-vs-boomers-habits-and-characteristics/

Tanenhaus, S. (2014, August 15). Generation nice. The New York Times. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/17/fashion/the-millennials-are-generation-nice.html?_r=0

Taylor, T.C. (2016, March 23). Workplace flexibility for millennials: Appealing to a valuable new generation. Thrive. Retrieved from https://www.adp.com/thrive/articles/workplace-flexibility-for-millennials-appealing-to-a-valuable-new-generation-3-324

Continue Reading